Updating existing HVAC system with barometric ventilation

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MadMax
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Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2020 8:06 pm

Updating existing HVAC system with barometric ventilation

Post by MadMax »

When my HVAC contractor installed my system, he followed the majority of the specs, except he omitted the barometric input and exhaust units... claiming that the units didn't need them and provided sufficient fresh air as they were manufactured.

Up until now, I haven't worried about the need for fresh air. But there is mounting evidence during this pandemic that minimizing viral load through additional fresh air is an essential part of a responsible mitigation plan.

I'm not versed enough in HVAC to make the call for what unit specs should be or what I need to talk to a contractor about...

I could sure use some guidance and help....
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johnb
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Re: Updating existing HVAC system with barometric ventilation

Post by johnb »

MadMax wrote: Wed Dec 09, 2020 10:51 pm When my HVAC contractor installed my system, he followed the majority of the specs, except he omitted the barometric input and exhaust units... claiming that the units didn't need them and provided sufficient fresh air as they were manufactured.

Up until now, I haven't worried about the need for fresh air. But there is mounting evidence during this pandemic that minimizing viral load through additional fresh air is an essential part of a responsible mitigation plan.

I'm not versed enough in HVAC to make the call for what unit specs should be or what I need to talk to a contractor about...

I could sure use some guidance and help....
Max,
A few points: from the book; Building Physics - Heat, Air, and Moisture - Hugo S. L. C. Hens (you should get this book)

1. "K. Seiffert, in his book ‘Wasserdampfdiffusion im Bauwesen’ (Water vapour diffusions in buildings) led to what today is called the vapour barrier phobia, even more that the text overlooked the most important cause of interstitial condensation: air displacement in and across building assemblies.
That air transport figured as the main cause of interstitial condensation was stated in a publication in 1961, A. G. Wilson of NRC wrote ‘One of the most important aspects of air leakage in relation to the performance of Canadian buildings is the extent to which it is responsible for serious condensation problems. Unfortunately, this is largely unrecognized in the design and construction of many buildings, and even when failures develop the source of moisture is often incorrectly identified’."

2. A well-designed ventilation system does not function properly when the building envelope lacked air-tightness. Moisture can be very damaging to the insulation quality of some materials and could cause health problems.

You must have a high-quality fresh-air exchange for optimal health and mental concentration. The ventilation system should be the 'energy recovery' type and filtered.
The connections to the ventilation system into and out of the sealed studio rooms should be baffled to block sound passage from one room to the next and the ducting should be double-insulated and flexible. It probably goes without saying that the fresh air intake to the ERV must be separated from the exhaust by at least 6'8" (2 meters), or better - in separate walls.
It's important to note that the studio wall system must be sealed as well as all the rooms to prevent moisture problems.
http://www.iea-ebc.org/Data/publication ... 32_tsr.pdf
and I've always found this site helpful
https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/desi ... d_121.html
https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/acco ... -d_70.html
Cheers,
John
John H. Brandt
Recording Studio, Performance Hall, & Architectural Acoustics Consultants
"Twenty Thousand Dollars worth of Snap-On Tools doesn't make you a Professional Diesel Mechanic"
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